E THEME BY EXCOLO
26-year-old mexican graphic designer and wannabe illustrator. Full-time fangirl.
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blackfashion:

Herieth Paul, the face of Anthropologie’s Spring 2014 catalogue lookbook. 
www.anthropologie.com

Tagged with: #people  #wear  
losexcentricos:

when you forget to click anon

losexcentricos:

when you forget to click anon

Tagged with: #funny  

cypher2:

ESPN Films and ESPN W | Nine for IX “Branded” | for saveitlikesolo

I think without question women who aspire to be athletes, who want to play sports, are better off today than they were thirty years ago. I think it really encouraged young girls to go out there and aspire to their dreams and try to reach their goals. 

But despite Title IX, women have really gained very little at the professional sports level over time. 

It’s a cultural issue. It’s not just a women in sport issue. As a culture we have to look at all of the messages we send out on a daily basis about what we think is important. I think we’ve made a lot of progress. But I think we have a lot of progress to make.

Tagged with: #issues  #women  

its-salah:

The modern world’s greatest hypocrisy.

Tagged with: #issues  
epicleicaness:

andeventhis:

chocolateist:

pardonmewhileipanic:

bestnatesmithever:

captcreate:

The leg up at the end tho.

I like the coach, putting his hands on his knees like, “Welp, that wasn’t it.”

i was almost like “oh man that sucks” and then her leg popped and i fucking lost it

That leg is killing me

10

^For reals

epicleicaness:

andeventhis:

chocolateist:

pardonmewhileipanic:

bestnatesmithever:

captcreate:

The leg up at the end tho.

I like the coach, putting his hands on his knees like, “Welp, that wasn’t it.”

i was almost like “oh man that sucks” and then her leg popped and i fucking lost it

That leg is killing me

10

^For reals

Tagged with: #funny  

Protest calling for an end to Israeli aggression against Palestinians in London today

11th July, 2014.

Tagged with: #issues  

buckbarrow:

do you ever have second-hand obsessions

like one of your friends is super obsessed with a thing so whenever you see something about it you’re like “YES THIS THING” but you’re not the one obsessed with it. they are. you know very little about this thing and yet it still excites you because it excites your friend

Tagged with: #funny  #fandom  

She was 18 years old, a freshman, and had been on campus for just two weeks when one Saturday night last September her friends grew worried because she had been drinking and suddenly disappeared.

Around midnight, the missing girl texted a friend, saying she was frightened by a student she had met that evening. “Idk what to do,” she wrote. “I’m scared.” When she did not answer a call, the friend began searching for her.

In the early-morning hours on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges in central New York, the friend said, he found her — bent over a pool table as a football player appeared to be sexually assaulting her from behind in a darkened dance hall with six or seven people watching and laughing. Some had their cellphones out, apparently taking pictures, he said.

Later, records show, a sexual-assault nurse offered this preliminary assessment: blunt force trauma within the last 24 hours indicating “intercourse with either multiple partners, multiple times or that the intercourse was very forceful.” The student said she could not recall the pool table encounter, but did remember being raped earlier in a fraternity-house bedroom.

The football player at the pool table had also been at the fraternity house — in both places with his pants down — but denied raping her, saying he was too tired after a football game to get an erection. Two other players, also accused of sexually assaulting the woman, denied the charge as well. Even so, tests later found sperm or semen in her vagina, in her rectum and on her underwear.

It took the college just 12 days to investigate the rape report, hold a hearing and clear the football players. The football team went on to finish undefeated in its conference, while the woman was left, she said, to face the consequences — threats and harassment for accusing members of the most popular sports team on campus.

A New York Times examination of the case, based in part on hundreds of pages of disciplinary proceedings — usually confidential under federal privacy laws — offers a rare look inside one school’s adjudication of a rape complaint amid a roiling national debate over how best to stop sexual assaults on campuses.

Whatever precisely happened that September night, the internal records, along with interviews with students, sexual-assault experts and college officials, depict a school ill prepared to evaluate an allegation so serious that, if proved in a court of law, would be a felony, with a likely prison sentence. As the case illustrates, school disciplinary panels are a world unto themselves, operating in secret with scant accountability and limited protections for the accuser or the accused.

At a time of great emotional turmoil, students who say they were assaulted must make a choice: Seek help from their school, turn to the criminal justice system or simply remain silent. The great majority — including the student in this case — choose their school, because of the expectation of anonymity and the belief that administrators will offer the sort of support that the police will not.

Yet many students come to regret that decision, wishing they had never reported the assault in the first place.

Tagged with: #issues  #women